Strength Training

Strength TrainingAddressing the One Critical Factor That Makes ALL the Difference for Enhanced Strength Training – Part 1!

I just recently wrote a very long article on strength training for another website and I thought I would share it with you. Why? Because it has a great deal to do with human performance since it centers on cardiovascular performance.

Whether you are a competitive athlete or just living and breathing, your human performance and how well you function is highly dependent upon the one critical factor most people never pay attention to. That critical factor is the health of your endothelial cells and their ability to properly produce nitric oxide.

While this article was written to help athletes improve their strength training, performance, and recovery it also applies to those whose only exercise is pushing the buttons on their remote control. Here is the first part of this groundbreaking article on strength training:

The field of strength training is both very broad and extremely dynamic. Broad because of the types of activities athletes engage in to improve their strength and conditioning. These activities could include general strength and conditioning programs for overall fitness to very unique and specific programs tailored to their particular sport. It could include resistance training, interval training, speed and agility training, plyometrics, injury prevention, and a wide range of other worthwhile methods to achieve the goal of increased muscular strength and endurance.

The area of strength training is also extremely dynamic because science continues to unlock the complex association between biochemistry, nutrition, physiology, anatomy, and other scientific disciplines that can help to enhance athletic performance through improved strength training. Research and science that can be used to enhance general health and physical fitness as well as enhanced physical performance during athletic events.

‘Whether you are a professional athlete or just a fitness enthusiast, the following information about Strength Training will be eye opening!’

That’s a bold statement but if you continue to read the rest of this article you will see an area of anatomy, biochemistry, and nutrition seldom addressed in the textbooks written on strength training. Yet these three components have Nobel Prize winning science and cutting edge vascular research that hasn’t yet been properly applied to strength training. Whether you’re a recreational athlete or a professional athlete, this sound scientific information has resulted in clinical proof and application for improved cardiovascular health. It now has the potential to take your strength training program to a whole new level.

One Common Element Found in Strength Training, Performance, and Recovery!

While there are a wide variety of training programs and techniques to prepare you and your body for your athletic performance, when you break it all down there are just 3 components to improved strength training. These components are:

Training

Performance

Recovery

However, when you look at these 3 components, central to everything is your cardiovascular system. While your heart is vitally important to this system it’s not the organ that will make the ultimate difference. That organ is the endothelium that lines all of your cardiovascular system including your heart!

Most people in strength training have never even heard of this organ. One of the best books on strength training is Conditioning for Strength and Human Performance by T. Jeff Chandler and Lee E. Brown. In 476 pages of excellent information, with a specific chapter on “The Cardiorespiratory System”, there was not one mention of this organ. Even the Index has no listing for the endothelium.

Yet this organ and the critical functions that it performs are central to the health of your cardiovascular system. It is the key component in your body’s ability to deliver needed oxygen and nutrients to fuel your muscles as well as effectively remove waste products that can limit your strength training workout and overall results.

The rest of this article will help show you how important this little known, but critically important organ is to strength training. It all centers on the endothelium’s ability to properly produce a simple molecule called nitric oxide and all the impact nitric oxide can have on training, performance, and recovery.”

Intrigued? I hope so!

If you’re an athlete of any kind I’m going to help you understand how you can take your strength training program to a whole new level. In Part 2 I’ll explain some sports science and why you need to pay attention to the health of your endothelial cells and their ability to properly produce nitric oxide.

Together we can work to save a million lives!

Dan Hammer

Dan Hammer has a background in biology, chemistry, and exercise physiology. He used to run one of the largest health club operations in the Chicagoland area and has been helping people with their wellness issues for more than 25 years.

The information contained in this article is for general information purposes only and never as a substitute for professional medical advice or medical exam. The information about Strength Training contained in this article has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and should not be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease without the supervision of a qualified medical doctor.

Fiber, Cholesterol, and Other Health Benefits!

Fiber SourcesIf you read my post http://no-more-heart-disease.com/fiber-and-cholesterol-reduction/Fiber and Cholesterol Reduction”[/intlink] you know how important fiber can be in helping to lower the “BAD” LDL cholesterol to prevent the cardiovascular disease atherosclerosis.    Fiber is also important in reducing the risk for certain types of cancer, helping control blood sugar for diabetics, reducing the risk for stroke, improving elimination, and can be a useful tool in weight management.  

Because fiber is so important to your general health and wellness I’ve put together a list of good sources of fiber.  Please use this fiber list as a general guide in helping you to find some foods and food groups that appeal to you and your taste buds.  For simplicity, I’ve grouped these items according to grams per serving.  

Serving sizes can vary and so can calories per serving so you will need to read the nutritional label.  This list is not complete but it will help you when you go to the market.   

2 to 4 grams of fiber per serving:

Almonds:  ¼ cup is 2.4 grams

Applesauce:  ½ cup is 2.7 grams

Apricots:  2 halves dried are 1.7 grams

Avocado:  ½ average sized is 2.8 grams

Banana:  1 medium is 3.0 grams

Boston Brown Bread:  2 slices are 4.0 grams

Broccoli:  1 cup cooked or raw is 3 grams

Brussel Sprouts:  1 cup is 4.0 grams

Cabbage:  1 cup cooked is 4.0 grams

Carrots:  1 cup cooked is 4 grams

Cauliflower:  1 cup cooked is 2.5 grams

Celery:  ½ cup raw is 4.0 grams

Coconut:  1 tablespoon dried is 3.4 grams

Corn:  1 cup cooked is 4 grams

Cornbread:  1 square (2 ½”) is 3.4 grams

Cornflakes Cereal:  1 cup is 3.5 grams

Cracked Wheat Bread:  2 slices are 3.6 grams

Cranberries:  ½ cup in sauce form is 4.0 grams

English Muffin (Whole Wheat):  1 whole muffin is 3.7 grams

Okra:  1 cup fresh or cooked is 3.2 grams

Orange:  1 large is 2.4 grams

Parsnip:  1 large cooked is 2.8 grams

Peach:  1 medium is 2.3 grams

Pear:  1 medium is 4.0 grams

Puffed Wheat Cereal:  1 cup is 3.3 grams

Pumpernickel Bread:  2 slices are 4.0 grams

Rice (White):  ½ cup before cooking is 2.0 grams

Strawberries:  1 cup is 3.0 grams

Turnip:  ½ cup cooked is 2.0 grams

Watermelon:  1 thick slice is 2.8 grams

Wheaties Cereal:  1 cup is 2.0 grams

Zucchini:  ½ cup raw or cooked is 3.0 grams

 

4.1 to 6 grams of fiber per serving:

Apple:  1 large raw is 4.5 grams

Artichokes:  1 large is 4.5 grams

Beets:  1 cup cooked is 5.0 grams

Blackberries:  ½ cup is 4.4 grams

Bran Flakes Cereal:  1 cup is 5.0 grams

Bran Flakes with Raisins Cereal:  1 cup is 6.0 grams

Bran Meal:  3 tablespoons are 6 grams

Dark Rye Bread:  2 slices are 5.8 grams

Flatout Wraps:  1 wrap has 5 grams of fiber or more

Green Beans (Snap):  1 cup is 4.2 grams

Idaho Baked Potato:  1 medium with skin is 5.0 grams

Macaroni (Whole Wheat):  1 cup cooked is 5.7 grams

Mashed Potato:  1 cup is 6.0 grams

Noodles (Whole Wheat Egg):  1 cup cooked is 5.7 grams

Raspberries:  ½ cup is 4.6 grams

Rice (Brown):  ½ cup before cooking is 5.5 grams

Sauerkraut (Canned):  1 cup is 4.6 grams

Seven-Grain Bread:  2 slices are 6.5 grams

Shredded Wheat (Spoon Sized):  1 cup is 4.4 grams

Spaghetti (Whole Wheat):  1 cup cooked is 5.6 grams

Sweet Potato:  1 medium is 5.5 grams

Whole Wheat Bread:  2 slices are 6.0 grams

Whole Wheat Raisin Bread:  2 slices are 6.5 grams

 

6.1 to 10 grams of fiber per serving:

Bran Chex Cereal:  1 cup is 7.5 grams

Buckwheat Groats (Kasha):  1 cup cooked is 9.6 grams

Cracklin’ Bran Cereal:  1 cup is 8 grams

Fruit N’ Fiber Cereal:  1 cup is 7 grams

Greens (Collards, Beet Greens, Kale, Turnip Greens):  1 cup cooked is 8.0 grams

High-Bran “Health” Bread:  2 slices are 7.0 grams

Lentils:  1 cup cooked is 6.4 grams

Nabisco 100% Bran Cereal:  1 cup is 8.0 grams

Peas (Green):  1 cup is 7 grams

Rutabaga (Yellow Turnip):  1 cup is 6.4 grams

Yams:  1 medium is 6.8 grams

 

10.1 and above grams of fiber per serving:

All Bran Cereal:  ½ cup is 10.4 grams

Baked Beans:  1 cup is 16 grams

Black Beans:  1 cup cooked is 14 grams

Bran Buds Cereal:  ½ cup is 10.4 grams

Chickpeas (Garbanzos):  1 cup cooked is 12 grams

Figs:  3 dried are 10.5 grams

Great Northern Beans:  1 cup is 16 grams

Kidney Beans:  1 cup cooked is 19.4 grams

Lima Beans:  1 cup canned or cooked is 11.6 grams

Navy Beans:  1 cup cooked is 18 grams

Oatmeal Cereal:  1 cup is 10.3 grams

Pinto Beans:  1 cup cooked is 18.8 grams

Spinach:  1 cup cooked is 14 grams

Split Peas:  1 cup cooked is 13.4 grams

White Beans:  1 cup canned or cooked is 16 grams 

This guide will give you a good start in finding foods that will help you increase your fiber intake. However, due to its complexity, laboratory technicians have not yet been able to ascertain the exact fiber content of many foods.  Because of this, you may find discrepancies from one source to another.  Add to the fact that there are varying sizes of fruits and vegetable, as well as growing conditions, and you can begin to understand why there might be some variations in the number of grams of fiber listed for different food items.    

Together we can work to save a million lives! 

Dan Hammer 

The information contained in this blog is for general information purposes only and never as a substitute for professional medical advice or medical exam.  The information contain in this blogging website has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and should not be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease without the supervision of a qualified medical doctor.